GWYNETH MORELAND - CIDER

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Gwyneth Moreland (from the album Cider)

The inspiration of art and music that was the backdrop for the formative years of Gwyneth Moreland becomes the same formula she uses to brew her recent release, Cider. After leaving the west coast to work as a veterinary technician in Denver, Colorado, Gwyneth returned to the artistic environment of family and hometown in Mendocino, California. Gwyneth Moreland used the conditions and scenery in the creation of the Folk music-based tracks contained in Cider. She recalled that ‘our home was always filled with art and music. My writing is heavily influenced by the environment up here in the misty redwoods overlooking the crashing Pacific Ocean’. Cider boards “The California Zephyr” to make a SoCal exit as it heads to Los Angeles’ Union Station, sings to the love-crossed spirit of “Danny Parker” against a backdrop of mountain music for a getaway, uses soft strums for the warmth that battles winter weather inside “Farmhouse”, and backs “Summer Song” with quietly rattling rhythms.

Gwyneth Moreland traded her talents in veterinary work for studio time with producer David Hayes (Van Morrison) as she returned to solo output with the 2014 album Ceilings, Floors, and Open Doors. She goes back in David Hayes’ Shack in the Back Studio to work once again with the producer for Cider, welcoming in musical friends such as drummer Ralph Humphrey (Frank Zappa) and former Flying Burrito Brother and member of The Byrds, Gene Parsons, on pedal steel and banjo. Cider opens on a Folk shuffle with “Movin’ On”, works through relationship hurdles in “Your Smile”, searches for love with “Little Bird”, and picks a sad melody for “Eloise”. Gwyneth Moreland offers a Folk sound to widen the appeal of California Country as she lightly steps down “Broken Road” and floats in dreams of round apple orbs cascading into “Cider” for the title track.

Listen and buy the music of Gwyneth Moreland from AMAZON or iTunes

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